Have you ever found yourself in the following situation: your website has received a professional makeover, your goods and services are polished and ready to sell, and you open your coaching doors in anticipation of finding your first customer? Sales, coaching-related questions, and email list sign-ups will all come your way. But after that, you’ll hear from those who decide against hiring you as a coach. Or the sales of your goods may dwindle to a trickle. There are many reasons why potential customers choose not to join up, but it’s difficult to not take that rejection personally. Keep in mind that they aren’t rejecting YOU personally; they’re just not ready to buy your book, employ a coach, or anything else at this time.

  1. Thank your customers for their feedback.

Negative feedback is often avoided, but in the long term, it will only benefit you. Don’t be hesitant to ask this question; if you don’t know why you were rejected, how can you improve? Instead of blocking them on social media at this time, do the reverse, continue to follow them, reply to their posts and comments, and make it clear to them and the rest of the world that you are accessible in case they decide against coaching.

  1. Offer a low-budget coaching option.

Offer a group program, your eBook, or a home study course as an alternative if a potential client cannot afford your 1:1 coaching. No matter the level of income of your customers, you should have a library of products at various price points. Encourage people to sign up for your email list if you don’t yet have a library so you can stay in touch and let them know when new things are introduced.

  1. Be consistent in your marketing efforts. 

Simply because your sales have slowed down, don’t give up. Find new and interesting ways to connect with your target audience instead. Make offers to your email list proactively. Post more regularly on social media to boost your presence. Utilize live networking events to connect with regional company owners. Make a concerted effort to shine in the spotlight and brag about yourself since it’s difficult to grow a business from the background.

Importantly, follow up with everyone who declined your coaching with a plan. The timing might not be ideal. Perhaps they should expand their own company before recruiting you. Perhaps they should take care of some family obligations before concentrating on their business. 

Ask for recommendations as well. Prospect 1 may not be the best candidate at this time, but they might know someone in their network who would be. Have you ever found yourself in the following situation: your website has received a professional makeover, your goods and services are polished and ready to sell, and you open your coaching doors in anticipation of finding your first customer? Keep in mind that they are simply not ready to hire a coach at this time, not because of YOU personally.

Are Your Prices Turning People Away From Your Programs?

It’s important to reevaluate and precisely determine your pricing structure if you’re concerned that your rates don’t adequately convey the worth of your goods. That’s the subject of my upcoming 4-part Livestream session, “How to Get Paid What You’re Worth,” which you can finish at home as your schedule permits. To help you get serious about your business and match your pricing to your offerings, each course has a separate workbook with checklists.

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